Burning Bridges, Part III

People continue to amaze me.  And, unfortunately, not always in a good way.  

LinkedIn is, as defined by Google:

… the world’s largest professional network with millions of members and growing rapidly. We can help you: Establish your professional profile and control one of the top search results for your name. Build and maintain a broader network of professionals you can trust.

The key word here is “professional network”.  A professional network, as defined by Wikipedia:

… is a type of social network service that is focused solely on interactions and relationships of a business nature rather than including personal, nonbusiness interactions

Check out this beauty of a LinkedIn message I received on Friday:

BURNING BRIDGES.

Since when has LinkedIn started allowing this?  I guess they don’t and can’t control what people do.  But… What made this person think it was ok for them to solicit an “honest and happy relationship” on LinkedIn?  Let alone, send it to about 10 different people in bulk?  

If being a recruiter has taught me anything, it is to personalize every message you write to target your audience.  This person obviously didn’t heed this lesson.  Oh, the irony.

 

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Burning Bridges, Part II

I am an optimist.  I always try to find the best in people… Until I encounter something ridiculous.  I am always surprised by what I encounter on a weekly basis as a recruiter.

When interviewing with a company, the rule of thumb “don’t burn bridges” applies greatly.  I had a candidate who was interviewing for one of my open positions.  Seemingly great background, good personality match, and he and I had a great conversation.  But, we aren’t moving forward with him…  And here is why:

  1. Hung up on his interviewer.  He was mid-conversation with the Hiring Manager (HM) when the HM asked a tough question about management, who he works under, etc.  Understandable question since HM used to work for this candidate’s current company.  The candidate must have been terrified because he quite literally hung up on the HM, and was not reachable after that.
  2. Was misleading about their employment.  As mentioned above, the HM had previously worked at the candidate’s “current” company.  I put current in quotes because the candidate was no longer an active employee.  Naturally, we (recruiters) will find out as much as we can about a candidate through means of our own.  As I’ve mentioned in previous posts… We know people, who know people.
  3. Hit on the recruiter.  Check out the final email I received (below).  This is not ok.  Ever.

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My advice?  There is a way to bow out of an interview (or anything, really) gracefully.  Don’t burn bridges; you never know when you will need that network.