What did I do wrong??

Have you ever:

  • Sent an email to a recruiter… and never heard back?
  • Applied for a job… and never heard back?
  • Interviewed… and never heard back?

Let’s face it, the answer is a resounding “YES” to all of the above.  Don’t be shy.  We have all been there.  Even the best of us have struggled in our job searches.  And that’s ok!  So many times, I get asked “What did I do wrong?”

I can sum it up into one word: PRESENTATION.  This applies to anything and everything involved in an interview process.

Imagine the following scenario.  You email a recruiter, “Hi there, I’m intrested in the sales postion your posted on LinkedIn.  Selling SaaS software is my life, and I can’t wait to here from you!”  What’s wrong with this?  You want me to believe you’re great at what you do if you can’t use spell check?  Your crazy. (See what I did there? :))

Let’s try another scenario. You sent your resume into the “resume black hole”.  Why didn’t you get a call back?  I can go on and on and on about reasons why you didn’t.  But, let me list the most common.  1)  You weren’t a fit for the role.  Did you read the job description?  Do you have the required hard skills?  2) Your resume says another company’s name in the Objective.  “I want to help build NOT-YOUR-COMPANY’S brand to it’s potential.”  Great, good luck with that!  3) No contact information.  Surprised?  Don’t be.  A lot of times, candidates do not provide a good phone number or email address for us to reach them.  If we can’t reach you, how can you be considered for the role?

Ok, one more.  You got the call back!  Congrats!  You interviewed with the team, thought it went well, and… nothing.  I will say that it is NEVER ok for a recruiter/company to not provide you with an update to your candidacy.  But what could have possibly gone wrong?  You thought you had it in the bag!  Again, PRESENTATION.  Did you research the company?  Were you an off-the-wall bundle of energy interviewing at an old-school, play-by-the-rules corporation?  Did you wear jeans and a t-shirt to a super formal workplace?  Perhaps your thoughts were all over the place, or maybe you were a nervous wreck.

The moral of the story is: presentation.  Be diligent with you who present to your potential future employer.  How do you want them to see you?  What kind of person do you want them to view you as?  What is it they will gain by hiring you?

As always… head up, chin down!  Good luck!

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Going About Your Job Search

I had drinks with a former colleague of mine last night who, unfortunately, is on the job hunt.  Over the course of two hours, we sat talking about the types of companies that are popping up, the ingenuity (and sometimes, pure chance) of the people creating these companies, the opportunities he’s interested in, the companies he’s interested in, and what he’d love to be doing.

In listening to him talk about how he is going about finding opportunities for himself, it made me realize how many different approaches people take to navigate the job market.  Maybe you are using one of these strategies.  Maybe you aren’t using any of them at all.  Perhaps you could use a fresh set of techniques to assist you in your search.

I’ll outline some of the most common…

Job Boards.  Oh, the tried and true job boards.  There’s something to be said about them.  They’ve existed this long because the strategy works.  There’s a demand and a certain means to find that supply.  Easily searched, easily found.  It is a win-win for both employer and job seeker.

Target Companies.  Who wouldn’t want to work for a sexy “brand name” like Facebook, Google, or Pinterest?  We all know those companies and many want to work for them to have the company name on their resume.  In the same regard, however, there are smaller niche companies that tend to attract certain candidates.  In the same way, those job seekers specifically target opportunities at those companies.

Corporate Recruiters.  As a Corporate Recruiter, I say with certainty, that people search LinkedIn for “Corporate Recruiter” and connect with all of them with a note saying something in the likes of “I’m interested in working for your company. Please contact me so we can chat.”

Agency Recruiters.  An agency recruiter is one that is contracted out to many companies to fill roles.  They usually have a book full of listings they are trying to fill.  While they are acting as these company’s recruiters, they are also building relationships with people like you.  Learning about your likes, dislikes, career history, career progression, and dreams.  I see them as match makers.  If you are in a niche market, find a recruiter that specializes in your trade.

Networking.  How often have you heard the phrase “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know”?  There’s a lot of truth that rings behind this statement.  Someone you meet today, could very well be tomorrow’s founder of the next-big-thing.  Your dad’s old high school teammate and now fellow Board Member, is now the CEO of *insert big company name here*.  And your ex-girlfriend?  Well, she’s the lead recruiter for that position you so eagerly have your eye on.

LinkedIn.  LinkedIn is a great way for job seekers to follow companies, find job postings, figure out the people who posted the job posting, and network with people who currently (or formerly) worked there.  Using LinkedIn to network (see above) is also a great use of time for job seekers.  One day, it’ll certainly come in handy.

Social Media.  With the popularity of sites like Facebook and Twitter, finding an opportunity via this medium is becoming a new trend.  There are millions of people and companies that have accounts on these networks and “social recruiting” is a growing trend in the recruiting world.  Find, follow, and interact with those companies/individuals that interest you.

Now, you are probably sitting there thinking “Which technique works the best?”  My honest answer: All of the above.

Happy hunting!

Find Me A Job…

As a Corporate Recruiter, I cannot begin to tell you how many times someone (acquaintances and strangers are equally guilty) will email me their resume and say “I’m interested in working for your company”.

GREAT!

But, do us a favor.  Please go to our Job Board and find a position that interests you.  Tell us why you are interested and what makes you a good fit.  If we aren’t the recruiter for that position, rest assured that we will forward your resume to the correct recruiter.  While we’d love to help find you a great job, it is not a good use of anyone’s time to go back and forth, “Do you like this position? What about this one? Or this one?”  We don’t want to make assumptions on what you are interested in and/or what you would be good at.

If you are interested in working for our company…