It’s an “evolution”

My husband and I are firm believers in “evolution”. I’m not talking about the process by which living organisms are thought to have developed and diversified over the course of history, but rather the process by which we live and set goals. Let me explain.


Every year, every birthday, every job, every home, every time in our lives we should strive to make it better than the last. Like most things in life, evolution is never linear. But to trend upwards, to be able to say that I’m healthier, happier, more engaged, more “complete” today than I was yesterday makes me incredibly happy.


I’ve been lucky that, throughout my career, I’ve been able to make this same kind of upward trajectory. There have certainly been times where I questioned what I was doing, why I was doing it, and for whom I was doing it for. Over the course of the last 13 years, I lived by something an old mentor told me, “Strive to make yourself uncomfortable. That’s where you’ll grow the most.”


I have made a lot of mistakes, leapt (and tripped face first) over hurdles, turned my back on opportunities, and have jumped because someone told me to. Every single decision I have made, good or bad, has led me to where I am today, and, for that, I am thankful.


We may not all start off in a career/job that we dream of, but the ultimate goal is to get that place where everything feels “right”. I encourage you to make yourself uncomfortable.


Try something that you didn’t think you’d do… professionally, or personally. Be like Nike and “just do it”.




Person vs Candidate

As I was preparing a candidate for their final interview, he closed the call with this statement:


“I feel like I’ve been treated like a person, not a candidate… thank you for that. It’s so rare and it really makes you guys stand out.”


This was music to my ears!


Riding high on my giddiness, I publicly posted a snippet of the above quote on Twitter and LinkedIn. Not more than 24 hours later, I had a slew of direct/private messages asking something along the lines of “how can I make this happen for me, as a candidate?”


I had to take pause on this because I failed to realize that few candidates realize that it’s not them, it’s us!!! This has nothing to do with what you (candidate) are (or aren’t) doing. The responsibility lies 100% on us, the Recruiter/Recruiting Team/Hiring Leader that you are working with. It’s our responsibility to reach out with updates when we have them – or don’t have them. It’s our responsibility to connect with you on a human level. It’s our responsibility to give you the respect that you deserve as a candidate.


Candidate experience can be two-fold.


On one hand, very much like a company’s culture, how a Recruiter approaches candidate experience can come from the top. How is the organization differentiating themselves in this fight for talent? How will candidates remember the company after the interview process is over? What will candidates tell their friends about the company, regardless of whether they receive an offer?


On the other hand, candidate experience can be very recruiter-driven. How well do I (recruiter) want to be remembered by you (candidate)?


I don’t know who to address this blog to, so I will address the two parties.


To candidates — You are not doing anything “wrong” when your experience is subpar. No excuses from us as recruiters. It’s not ok (in my book).


To recruiters / hiring leaders — Let’s follow the golden rule of recruiting… Treat candidates the way you want to be treated.


PS – Happy Valentine’s Day!


2018 SKO Reflection

Allow me a moment of reflection.


This week, Pluralsight held its Sales Kickoff in Orlando, Florida. Over 300 individuals in the sales organization, together under one roof, celebrating the huge year we had in 2017 and planning for 2018 success. To hear the tremendous feats that we accomplished this year left me walking away from each session with a smile.


What made me smile more was meeting many of the 200+ sales hires my colleagues and I have made over the last 12 months. Those individuals who made an impact in 2017. Those individuals who will make a huge impact in 2018.


But, what made me smile even more was the fact that every single person we met was here for the same reason… and that energy overflowed! They all believe in what we are trying to accomplish as a company. They feel the passion that exudes from our leadership. And they all want to work together to lead towards success. The intensity is contagious!


As we move into the week after Kickoff, I leave you with this message…


Find a company whose mission and values you can truly stand behind. It is then you will do the best work of your life.


Love what you do.



Burning Bridges, Part III

People continue to amaze me.  And, unfortunately, not always in a good way.  

LinkedIn is, as defined by Google:

… the world’s largest professional network with millions of members and growing rapidly. We can help you: Establish your professional profile and control one of the top search results for your name. Build and maintain a broader network of professionals you can trust.

The key word here is “professional network”.  A professional network, as defined by Wikipedia:

… is a type of social network service that is focused solely on interactions and relationships of a business nature rather than including personal, nonbusiness interactions

Check out this beauty of a LinkedIn message I received on Friday:


Since when has LinkedIn started allowing this?  I guess they don’t and can’t control what people do.  But… What made this person think it was ok for them to solicit an “honest and happy relationship” on LinkedIn?  Let alone, send it to about 10 different people in bulk?  

If being a recruiter has taught me anything, it is to personalize every message you write to target your audience.  This person obviously didn’t heed this lesson.  Oh, the irony.


Interview Question: What was the worst career move you have made?

I have gotten this interview question a few times in my career, and every time I thought to myself, “Well, that’s negative, isn’t it?”  But, as you take a step back and think about why the interviewer is asking it, you begin to realize exactly what they are trying to figure out.

If you ask me what my biggest career move, this is how I’d answer:

Out of college, I entered the world of sales.  I was good at it and made a lot of money.  I made a natural progression into Recruiting.  But, there came a point where I wanted to see what else I could do.  So, I left sales/recruiting and was hired as the Executive Assistant to the CEO of a biotech company.  It was a role completely foreign to me, but one that I wanted to explore.  I wanted to see what else I was capable of.

Within a few months, I knew that I had made a huge mistake.  I was miserable, and immediately started my job search.  It had absolutely nothing to do with the company or the people I worked with.  It was me.

I quickly learned that I was a proactive employee.  I like being responsible for my day.  I like knowing that I will “fail” if I don’t continue to put in work.  I like knowing that the work I put in today, pays off tomorrow.  I learned that some people are reactive employees, and like being given projects to be done on a deadline.  I was not that person.

Being proactive is like a game to me.  I’m competitive by nature and can’t just stand by and watch things happen.  And, that’s how I landed back in Recruiting.  My work is measurable and defines my success.

So, my “mistake”?  Going outside of my comfort zone.

The real question behind the real question?… What lessons have you learned along the way?

As always… head up, chin down!  GOOD LUCK!

Job Hunting is Like Dating!



Friends, we have all been there.  The wonderful world of dating!  Whether you are still courting your neighbor, flirting with every cute girl that walks into your office space, spending your time with your one-and-only (for now), or fully committed to Prince Charming… we have all “been there”.  The trials and tribulations of dating teaches us so many things in life.

… Like how to job search!

What?!  Seriously, Lianne?  Yes!  Let me explain.

PART 1:  Finding the “one”

  1. Setting standards.  As in dating, we need to know what we want.  If you have no direction, how will you ever find Mr. Right?  Take your standards and apply them to your job search.  What are you looking for?  What excites you?  What is an absolute deal-breaker?  What are you willing to compromise on?  Do you have your heart set on anything?
  2. First impressions matter.  Ask anyone about what they first noticed about their partner?  For fun, I asked my sister’s boyfriend and he responded, “How put together she was compared to everyone else”.  Couldn’t have said it better.  What is going to set you apart from everyone else?  How will the employer remember you, and not the guy who interviewed before you?
  3. Desperation stinks.  Who wants a stage-five clinger?  Don’t be that person.  Employers want to know they are hiring someone with options, not someone who will take the first thing thrown at them.  They want to know they are investing in YOU and what you bring to the table.
  4. Be yourself.  You want your date to like you for who you are… not who you pretend to be.  In the same regard, employers want to hire YOU!  Not who you are pretending to be.  Facades only get you so far.
  5. Two way street.  Dating is a two way street.  Do you like me as much as I like you?  No?  Then it probably will not work out in the long run.  A job hunt is the same way.  While it may work in the short-term, the company has to be just as much a fit for you, as you are for them.
  6. No big egos.  Big egos are a turn-off in almost any situation.  Need I say more?

PART 2:  Stages

  1. Courting.  Flirting with disaster?  Luring the forbidden?  Whatever you call it, you need to find a way to make them notice you!  How will you do that?  Wearing a big sparkly hat at the restaurant?  Maybe.  In a job search situation, being an industry expert certainly sets you apart.
  2. Dating.  This is essential.  It is where people learn about each other, where they learn whether or not they like what is under the makeup, where they determine if you fit their “standards” (see Part 1, #1).  Dating is like interviewing.  It’s a time for both parties to ask questions, to probe and to prodder about things that they want to know about, to find out what they love and hate about you.
  3. The Close.  After a few weeks, you know you’re 100% into her.  You want to spend all your time with her, and no one else.  You know you’ve found the match!  Now what?  Close to deal.  Make her your “better half”.  Just as in dating, when you find that company that is a mutual fit, find a way to seal the deal.  Sell them on your ability to transform their organization.

What do you think now?  Dating and job searching are pretty similar, huh?  That’s what I thought.

I wish you all a life full of happiness together 🙂


As always… chin up, head down!


Burning Bridges, Part II

I am an optimist.  I always try to find the best in people… Until I encounter something ridiculous.  I am always surprised by what I encounter on a weekly basis as a recruiter.

When interviewing with a company, the rule of thumb “don’t burn bridges” applies greatly.  I had a candidate who was interviewing for one of my open positions.  Seemingly great background, good personality match, and he and I had a great conversation.  But, we aren’t moving forward with him…  And here is why:

  1. Hung up on his interviewer.  He was mid-conversation with the Hiring Manager (HM) when the HM asked a tough question about management, who he works under, etc.  Understandable question since HM used to work for this candidate’s current company.  The candidate must have been terrified because he quite literally hung up on the HM, and was not reachable after that.
  2. Was misleading about their employment.  As mentioned above, the HM had previously worked at the candidate’s “current” company.  I put current in quotes because the candidate was no longer an active employee.  Naturally, we (recruiters) will find out as much as we can about a candidate through means of our own.  As I’ve mentioned in previous posts… We know people, who know people.
  3. Hit on the recruiter.  Check out the final email I received (below).  This is not ok.  Ever.


My advice?  There is a way to bow out of an interview (or anything, really) gracefully.  Don’t burn bridges; you never know when you will need that network.